Monthly Archives: October 2014

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Stag looking at me

Dale Webb Forest Photography

Here are the photographs of plants, animals and scenery that I took while I was out on my walk.

1) A young deer with it’s mother and father in the distance.
2) A beautiful looking stag where we were both looking straight at each other as i took the photograph.

Youngster with parentsYoung stag looking at me

1) A very majestic looking stag who’s antlers had just caught my eyesight in the distance as I spoke on the phone as mentioned in the post originally. A magnificent looking animal.
2) The same stag calling out, a noise which you can often hear during mating season.

Stag looking at me

Stag calling
1) The majestic looking stag with a young deer and a female.
2) Side profile of that same stag.

Stag with baby and mum

Stag 1

1) A large mushroom in macro. The texture on it’s surface really caught my attention.
2) A bright colored, lonely looking mushroom. Really caught me eye given that it was the only bright looking thing in that area.

Mushroom 2

Mushroom 1

1) Very colourful little buds.
2) Another shot of the buds.

Flowers 2

Flowers 1

1) Bright yellow colored but with some nasty looking spikes
2) I found the coloration of the leaves really interesting.

Cool leaves

Flower 1

1) A view of the distance above the strong color.
2) A view focusing on that strong color.

Bracken 2

Bracken 1

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Colour Wheel Orb

Jacob Toohill Featured Drawings

Here are the drawings that Jacob sent in to be featured on the site.

Tweret of the Nile

Space Claw (ref.model Anna Fisher 1985 Life Magazine)

Rita HaworthMote Dandelion

Goddess of the Mountain Lake (ref.model Bridget Malcom)



BMW GT (Original concept by Emil Baddal)

Bellerophon, Pegasus and the Chimera

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catarina paints

Catarina Garcia

Here are some examples of Catarina’s creative expression:

catarina Garcia low latent inhibitionCatarina CD artwork 2

catarina book cover illustration

catarina musicians painting project 3


catarina musicians painting project 2








catarina first solo

Catarina portraits 1



Please visit to see her full portfolio

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Rack Racka – There’s a new parody king in town!

The other day I was browsing my Facebook news feed and I saw someone share a video with the title, “Most Epic Nerf War in History”. How could I possibly not check out a video with that title!? I have to say that I am DAMN glad that I did because it opened up a whole can of worms for me. It’s how I found the RackaRacka Youtube channel and I’ve not laughed as much at a series of short films in a long t…… wait……ever.

You know when you watch a video that someone has made and straight away you realize that they’ve portrayed funny scenarios that you’ve only ever been able to play out in your mind whilst slightly smirking. The kind of video that has been done so well that if you were to actually portray some of your funny, fantasy based scenarios you’d probably do it in exactly the same way if you could?

The videos capture the type of completely uninhibited and imaginative thoughts that you somehow lose the ability to generate as you get older, it’s like a long lost skill that seeing someone else express in such a powerful manner gives you a deep sense of satisfaction, and leaves you feeling very much in awe at the skill involved. You can watch the videos, step back with your hand on your chin like someone pacing around a car before finally purchasing it and say “those guys absolutely nailed it”.

One of the greatest things about the videos and short films that these guys make is that they all have meaning, deep undertones and a level of comedy on a frequency that people who take life too seriously or who are too sensitive just aren’t receptive to, it’s invisible to them.

I got a chance to speak to Danny (one of the two twin brothers responsible for this uninhibited creative expression) and ask him a few questions.

If you are in anyway squeamish, sensitive to mock violence or don’t like bad language (life must really bother you a lot), then the videos may not be for you.


The first one of their videos that I watched:

Q) First off an introduction, could you give us a quick run through of the people most commonly involved in your films? 

RackaRacka is run by me and my twin brother Michael, we both write, edit and direct everything together. So whenever I use the word “WE” in my responses, I’m not talking about my team, I’m talking about me and my clone. The only real constant recurring actor is our boy Timani, he’s our closest friend – he’s the ripped black guy. Timani was always the tubby kid we used to push around as kids but puberty hit him like a cycle of steroids and now he could kick the shit out of any single one of us

Q) It looks as though you and your friends have always been a really tightly knit bunch ever since you were kids. Have you guys always had extremely active and creative imaginations, and were you all on the same sort of wave length from the start?

To begin with, we sort of hated each other. We would always meet up and wrestle or have stick battles at the park. Our friendships sort of blossomed out of “boys will be boys” violence. My brother and I have always been creative in some sense, before we picked up the camera we would be drawing our own movie covers or acting out tv shows based on characters we had invented. Not all of our friends were necessarily creative but they were extremely active, so we met halfway.
Here’s a more in depth article about the horror that was our childhood –

RackaRacka – Epic Childhood

Q) What were like during school and what was your experience of life in school like? Did you find it often restrictive and frustrating, and would you say that it was during school you really honed your ability to read people and how they’d react to certain things happening, in a sort of cause and effect type way?

Frustrating – yes, restrictive – depends on which school we’re talking about. At our first primary school we were both singled out by teachers for our learning abilities. We were divided from students and did alot of extra curricular classes and lessons. Tests revealed we had an unusually high IQ for our age. Life was pretty great at that school but we ended up having to move. We went from one school to another and then another. Somewhere during the process I stopped giving a shit about education and decided to rebel. I didn’t really care about learning and literally just wanted to have fun. We were problem children, every teacher knew us … I even got kicked out of an After School Care program.High school was the same story really, half the teachers loved us, the other half hated us. We got suspended alot … and I mean ALOT – it was always for things like making an inappropriate video, organizing a fake gang war on the oval, accidently flooding the Home Ec room, etc.

Q) When you’re choosing which things to parody and put your unique spin on, what are usually the deciding factors for you going with an idea? Does it take a while to put things together or is it case of you get so many ideas coming to you at once that you tend to just roll with things?

I’ve got a lot of ideas, they springboard at me everyday out of nowhere. I’ve got bookloads of jokes and lines of dialogues or cool shots I’d want to try and pull off –  whenever I’m done with one video, I look through my list and see what’s next.
We want to build ourselves as film-makers so every RackaRacka video will have its own film-making challenge – it could be a practical effect or VFX challenge or a directing challenge . We want to learn something with every video we shoot, that way we’re more prepared when it comes to shooting something bigger such as a feature film or television series. RackaRacka is just for fun, its a training ground. We could be rich off the whole thing but we refuse to put ads on our videos so we’re not getting paid ANYTHING, its not about money.

Q) Do you think that a lot of people around the world have become overly sensitive to things and that this actually presents you with a great unique style of humour helping make it all the more effective?

Stirring the pot is a creative urge I have. We’ve got a pretty controversial video in the works that is going after racism. Every character in the video is an extreme stereotype of themselves. Most people are going to consider the video racist but if they stop and watch it properly they’ll discover its not. We think racism is so disgustingly pointless and ugly and our video is going to show that – in its own offensive ‘racist’ way.

Q) Leading on from that last question I’ve noticed that on some of your YouTube videos there are a few comments from people who clearly haven’t understood you and the style of humor you use. What do you think when you see those kinds of comments given that (speaking from my own personal experiences), getting reactions out of people and ‘testing the boundaries’ can be both funny and very insightful.

Yeah, I’m with you there – I sort of like offending people. I like pushing the limits with my videos and I like poking fun at things some people would find taboo.Everyone’s offended way too easy these days, you can’t say anything with offending somebody down the line. Everybody’s living with an unnecessary  nanny-state mentality.

For me having grown up surrounded by some pretty horrific shit, I feel the need to poke fun at those topics. Things don’t seem so bad that way. Its passive aggressive in a way.
Because women get hit in my videos, I’m labelled a misogynist or because certain words are used we’re homophobic or racist – these people are missing the point. There’s shit-ton of black humor in our videos. There’s violence in my clips but its not real violence and it doesn’t glorify it either. It all just adds to the shock value which is critical with black comedy.

Harry Potter vs Star Wars


Q) With a few of your films videos (the Portal one, LOTR vs GOT, HP vs SW etc), it seems that you might have a bit of an ‘inner geek’ that you can really let run wild and express via your creations. With that said, what are some of your favorite movies and series in terms of the special effects and CGI used etc?

To be 100% honest, I’m not too big of a fan of CGI. I think its way too overused in film and television these days, although its so fucking expensive to use I still find it … cheap. I love practicality, with our portal video we tried to be as practical effect heavy as we were CG heavy. We built a fake floor for our actor to stand in for the ending scene and we fabricated a fake garage door to drive through – we also shattered a lot of tables and chairs.

Q) I love how you guys portray a lot of what most people will only ever play out in their minds. It must come with a certain satisfaction knowing that you’re giving the world something that most people wont dare to do, and certainly not as well as you do it?

That’s the beauty of it all, we’re exactly the same as we were when we were 10, only difference now is people can see the epic shit we’re acting out in our heads. A lot of our videos are based on the concept of imagination, like with our Table Tennis video, none of that stuff is actually happening in real life, it’s just what the characters pretend is happening. We cut away about halfway through to wide shot of no effects of color grade at all, it’s just us jumping around like idiots.

Table Tennis on drugs

Q) What kind of things do you watch for a great laugh? Any favourite comedians or film makers who you feel really nail a similar type of humour to yourselves?

I love the obvious inspirations, I love Sacha Baron Cohen and his dedication to every character he plays. I think Joan Rivers is so offensively funny, she will always say whatever the fuck is on her mind. South Park is another awesome example of creators not giving a shit if they tread on toes or cross the line. I like watching animated comedy more than live action though, they’re more capable of tackling black comedy as violently head than live action is.

Q) I’ve gotta ask, where did the idea to portray Ronald McDonald come from?
McDonalds. Every time I see their creepy mascot pinned up on the wall or in promotional photograph I can’t help but think “WTF? Who is this guy? What the does he do when he’s not smiling for the camera?” People see McDonalds as such a evil, monster of a corporation and I find it interesting that that’s the undertone of what comes across as a very bright, colorful and friendly place. I wanted Ronald’s parody character to be a metaphor of that.

Ronald, no matter how clinically insane he may be, has one outstanding quality. He’s loyal. He’s loyal to his brand, he’s loyal to his customers and if you shit-talk either one of them, you better start running.We’ve been trying so hard to make our audience hate Ronald but they won’t, no matter what he does, no matter how many women he shoots, no matter how many kids he kidnaps or how many people he beats to death they still love him and say “oh Ronald’s at it again”. God we love our audience!

Q) How receptive to everything you create are your family, and is it your mum who actively gets involved in the videos because I’m sure a lot of people think that’s awesome. 

Most of my family are actively following everything I do now. It wasn’t always that way, a lot of people were cynical or would laugh at us for wanting to pursue a career path in film. That’s slowly changing. Dad used to throw a fit of rage when we’d destroy the house – but now when he comes home to a house that’s literally turned upside down he takes a photo and sends it to everybody at work. (Keep in mind that we do clean up and replace everything we break).

The active family following is a little annoying at times, it results in concerned phone calls from relatives saying “WTF are you doing?!” “Why did you say that?” “You don’t understand what you’re doing!”And no, that’s not my actual mother, its a friend’s mother. She’s pretty much the coolest and most raw women you’ll ever meet. For us she’s that cool aunty that the rest of the adults hate haha.

Q) How many household items and pieces of furniture have been harmed in the making of yours films? :-) 

Take whatever estimation you currently have in your head, times it by about ten and there you’ll have your answer ;)

Q) Finally, there’s a lot of highlighting the over dramatization shown by a lot of people these days such as in the Facebook status video, the girl who’s been dumped etc. What would you say is the biggest underlying message behind your films/videos and your biggest aim in terms of what you want to achieve or give to the world? 

We exaggerate everything, we exaggerate every emotion and situation. We’re lucky enough to not be raised in a third world country, our daily life ‘issues’ haven’t got shit on what’s going on over in any war ridden country, yet we still run around and sook about every stupid thing – Facebook statuses and getting dumped. Our underlying message is: STOP TAKING EVERYTHING SO FUCKING SERIOUSLY!

Check out all of the RackaRacka videos on the RackaRacka Youtube channel found HERE


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cams image 5

Cameron Davison – Photoshop

Here are some examples of Cameron’s Photoshop art:

Developing the Brain

Developing the brain

Higher than Imagination

By Cameron Davison

By Cameron Davison




Immortals Din

Immortals Din

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Annelie Wendeberg Q&A

She’s an adjunct professor, blogger, workshop giver, mentor, occasional editor, and she’s an extremely original and creative author. I recently got the chance for a quick Q&A with her and to ask her about growing up, life, the positive and negative sides of being a writer and a few other aspects of her journey so far.

Hello Annelie and thank you very much for taking the time to speak with me today.

Q)The first thing I’d like to ask you is what made you decide to be an author to begin with, and how long have you been writing for?

A) Thank you for having me, Dale! As a kid, I used to do a lot of realistic pencil drawings, but I could never do anything creative – only copy what was there. It wasn’t very satisfying. As a scientist, I developed molecular techniques, which was very creative and satisfying. But as soon as I was (still am) head of a research group and became an adjunct professor, I sat on my butt, juggled with bureaucratic crap, and didn’t solve scientific problems any more. After a few years of that, the pent-up desire to be creative led me to writing, I think. I find it fascinating what words do to us. You can write a story and the first draft is usually crappy and you don’t feel anything but blah when reading it. But then you re-write and edit, and suddenly, the story comes to life and strikes a cord. The best is that it affects every reader in a unique way, because every single on of them brings in their own story, their own beliefs, and experiences, and this flows together with my story, which again is partly based on my own experiences, believes, and partly on my imagination. Sort of a Vulcan mind melt gone crazy.

How long I’ve been writing? Hm. As a scientist, one has to write and publish. We say, “Publish or perish,” because a scientist who doesn’t write will soon be unemployed. So I write since I’m a scientist, more or less since 1998. But really, you don’t want to read such stiff and bloated prose. Later, I started with the science blogging, because I find it important that science is communicated to the public in an understandable way. How else would anyone learn about climate change and biodiversity loss, if we scientists don’t learn to express ourselves without hiding behind jargon? Fiction writing is a rather new addition to my writing adventures. I started in December 2011 and self-published my first book nine months later.

Q) Yes I understand that you actually studied biology at university. Is that something you’d always wanted to do, and do you feel as though that’s helped you as an author?

A) I always wanted to be a biologist, but that wasn’t possible under East German regime. Only after the wall fell could I go to college and university (despite my poor grades).

Being a scdevilsgrinnew2-191x300ientist helped fiction writing in two ways: (A) analytical thinkers can analyse text better and find out why it does what it does to us emotionally, and (B) we scientists publish without ever having learned how to write, so it wasn’t so scary for me to consider self-publishing.

Q) It looks as though you had an active part to play in the fall of the Berlin Wall also, as you mention on your website that you took hammer and chisel and personally helped contribute to tearing the wall down. Do you feel as though that was really the beginning of your creative journey, as you must have felt very restricted before the wall fell?

A) Yes, the fall of the communistic dictatorship certainly allowed for more room for creativity. Before the wall fell I went to a very restrictive school. One was only a good pupil if one was able to repeat what the teacher said (with most teachers, not all). Having an understanding was secondary at best. That was boredom galore!

After the Wall fell, I went to a different school and suddenly I was allowed to think and interpret. What a culture shock! Strangely, I began to enjoy school!

Q) What was your life like when you were young, given that growing up with low latent inhibition can be extremely frustrating as it is, without the restrictions of growing up in a communist society?

A)I don’t ever want to repeat childhood. It was normal that I don’t belong, it was a given to most people I knew. I was convinced that one day, I’ll end up in a mental institution. It didn’t help that I had epileptic seizures that made my senses super-sensitive just a few minutes before the seizure struck, and for up to two days after it. How do you tell anyone that what you see, hear, and smell seems unnoticeable to others without giving the impression that you’re mad? The funny thing is that back then, the physician told my mother, “She’s a girl. Blood circulation problems are normal.” LOL.

Q) Obviously school wasn’t an enjoyable experience for you, but were you already enjoying expressing yourself through writing at that stage in your life, or did you find that the writing came later?

A)School screwed up my love for stories and books for about twenty years. I tried to write a diary, but I found that boring and depressing. The only things I read after school were academic papers and books. The writing came much, much later. It really started bleeding out of me in December 2011 when we moved into our house from 1529. That place is lovely, crooked, and somehow seems to stimulate creativity (in whatever way).

Q) In what ways do you feel that having low latent inhibition has influenced your work as a writer? Do you find it hard to collect all of your thoughts when you first have an idea for a book, and do you have a process that makes it easier for you to remember everything you would like to include when writing?

A) That’s hard to say because I don’t have a comparison; I’ve always only had that one funny brain. But isn’t it the essence of the arts that one can show people their own world from a unique angle and open horizons? Actually, science does that, too, but in a different way. Maybe everyone who explores life, the world, reality, and one’s own perception and the limits of it, and then finds a way to express this, is an artist. Or a vulnerable human being.TheFall-194x300

Q) Is there a common theme within the majority of your books? For example do your character often share traits that you yourself have, or do you try and ‘escape’ from yourself when writing?

A)Science and kiss-ass heroines are my common themes. I sneak in stuff like history of medicine, climate change, and the current pandemics (HIV/Aids, tuberculosis, and cholera are the global epidemics right now. It’s not Ebola), but my stories are always character-driven, because it interests me most what’s going on inside people when I throw them into a crisis.

The main character of my historical thriller series has LLI – she doesn’t know it, because the term didn’t exist in the Victorian era. She can’t filter out background noise, doesn’t understand why people are generally blind to details and slow to comprehend, and where “normal” people have something resembling a tunnel vision, her vision is much broader. That also hampers her because she has problems focusing on one thing only.

The main character from my science fiction series is synesthetic; to her, words have a flavour. Writing her is very enjoyable but also difficult – how does one put words to a word-flavour when sometimes, there is no good reference? For me, writing is both self-exploration and pushing my own limits of perception.

Q) What would you say your biggest frustration has been during your life as an author?

A)That each day always has only twenty-four hours.

Q) Who do you feel helped inspired you to write when you first started, and who or what inspires you to write these days? Do you have any favorite authors, and which are your favorite genres to read yourself?

There’s no one particular thing that inspires me; I can’t specifically put a finger on anything. Maybe life? I never managed to have one favorite author or one favorite genre. I’m rather eclectic when it comes to stories.

Q) One of your books ‘The Devil’s Grin’ involves an incredibly imaginative and creative character, a woman who masquerades as a man in order to practice medicine in Victorian London. I believe she even crosses paths with Sherlock Holmes. How did you come up with that idea, and was it difficult to write from the perspective of someone living in the Victorian era?

A)The Victorian era is intriguing because people there are already “modern” – they had machines, long-distance travelling with ships and trains, and long-distance communication using telegraphs. But they lived before antibiotics were discovered. Imagine London, a city with millions of people without proper sanitation, with roughly eighty thousand prostitutes, but without condoms and antibiotics. They used arsenic to treat syphilis, for crying out loud! They had cholera, tuberculosis, and other gruesome diseases. For a microbiologist, the Victorian London has tons of story material. But it’s also of general interest, because humanity today is moving towards the post-antibiotic era. The WHO keeps warning about the rise of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis strains and declared this a public heTheJourneyNewAgain-194x300alth crisis. There are approximately 900,000 new cases of multi-drug resistant TB each year – TB that’s near impossible to be cured with the antibiotics we have available (and you thought Ebola is a problem).

The other intriguing thing about the Victorians is that women back then had very few rights. They were not allowed to vote. They were expected to sit at home, look pretty, and serve their husbands. Throw in an intelligent and driven heroine and it gets quite interesting. Oh, Sherlock Holmes – he kind of sneaked in. I read Conan Doyle for the first time when I began writing this story and he just wouldn’t leave my crime scenes. I found him fascinating, because in my mind the man definitely has LLI.

Q) Do you find writing novels a very draining activity in terms of how you feel once you finally finish? Once you’ve finished a novel do you sit back and take a break for a while or are you quickly thinking up ideas for the next project?

A)Writing is very energizing. It’s the re-writing and the editing forty or fifty times that are draining. Once “the thing” (= manuscript) is finally sent to the proof-reader, I hate it so much that I have to get rid of it as soon as possible (= publish).

Q) You’ve also mentioned on your website that your stories flow easier when you keep your hands busy, and as a result you’ve built up quite a large collection of scarfs and shawls. Do you feel that your low latent inhibition is partly responsible for you always needing to feel busy and always having something on your mind? Do you also feel that low latent inhibition has given you a creative edge in life, seeing as you have a wide range of talents including environmental microbiology, spinning and weaving, writing, keeping an online blog, helping mentor other writers and you’re also a workshop giver on creative science writing. It certainly seems that you love to keep yourself busy!

A)I’m unable to sit still and do nothing. Even doing one thing only is quite difficult. I have no idea if that is in any way related to LLI. I found that working with both hands (weaving and spinning needs both hands, for example) gives my thoughts a more even flow. If I don’t know how to solve one particularly difficult scene, working with both hands helps to undo the knots.

 But yes, I think that a certain sensitivity to one’s surroundings is needed creative work.

Q) Of all of the books you’ve written so far, do you have one which you would consider your favourite and what sets that apart from the others in terms of it’s creation?

A)Um… I always love what I write and hate what I’ve published. The book I hate the least is The Lion’s Courtship. What sets this story apart from the other books is that it’s written in third person present tense, which allowed me to switch between people’s heads and be several characters in one book. These people are very diverse and colourful – there’s a thief, a serial murderer, a do-gooder nurse, a pimp, a madam, several prostitutes, and a guy who (simply by being too slow and too busy with his own shit life), allows a gruesome crime to happen.

Q) What can your readers expect from you in the future in terms of further novels, and can you see yourself carrying on for a long time?TheLionsCourtship3-210x300

A)I’ll finish the second science fiction book in December (I hope) and maybe start the next book in the Kronberg thriller series. Or write book 3 in the SF series. That’s not decided yet. Uh! Wait! There’s a fantasy novel in the pipeline, too. The problem is that as much as I like multitasking, I can’t write three books simultaneously. Maybe I’ll learn this one day? But yes, I’ll certainly keep writing for years.

Q) If you have any words of advice for people either with or without low latent inhibition who are looking to become writers, what would your advice be?

A)If you know that this is the thing you absolutely must do and you love it and you hurt when you find no time or space do it, then WRITE. Work hard, and I mean HARD. You have a demanding day job, five kids, a house to build, and grandparents to take care of? Then write at night and deal with the sleep deprivation later. Make art. Make it bleed.

Q) If you could do anything differently in terms of your writing career to date, what would you change and why?

A)I rarely think that way; it would be a waste of energy and time. Besides, I like my mistakes (that’s a lie, I hate them) – they force me to learn. I’m not particularly afraid of failure, at least not to such a degree that the fear holds me back from trying new things.

Thank you very much for your time Annelie and for those who’d like to visit Annelie’s website you can do so by going to and you can also purchase any of her books via Amazon HERE.

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Jono Renton Photography

The other day I had a website brought to my attention via Facebook and thought I’d have a look and check it out. I’ve really started to get into photography myself recently after spending years admiring the work of other people, and since I’ve started taking photographs myself I have a new found appreciation for just how hard it is to get the ‘perfect shot’, or sometimes to even be happy with the shots you’ve spent all day actually taking. Within seconds I was incredibly glad that I’d taken the time to have a look, and that feeling didn’t wear off for quite some time!

The website I’d had brought to my attention was that of Jono Renton ( and his portfolio of photographs which appear in front of you on his homepage gripped me straight away. Within seconds I was determined to look through every single photograph on his website because I found that they had this very special appeal to them, specifically the main gallery which is the first set of photographs that you’re presented with.

What I found was an absolutely stunning set of landscape photographs which all include a central feature, whether that be a tower, a tent, a bridge or a hut or a series of other very attractive focal points. It was while I was looking through them that a common theme I felt I can really relate to, set off this great feeling of realization inside my mind which quickly turned into an insistence that i check to see whether they all have a similar style.

The common theme that I recognized was a theme of isolation, peace, solitude. In each photograph there was an object or a few similar objects that were surrounded by very vast landscapes, which I can imagine many people would interpret as the object (or series of objects) looking a little out of place, odd, not quite fitting in and always setting itself apart from everything else in the scene.

I imagine a strong majority of people with low latent inhibition (and also many people without low latent inhibition) as they’ve gone through life have at times felt very isolated, and as though they don’t quite belong in certain scenarios or settings, but are actually able to take a strangely pleasant solace from that feeling. I think that Jono does an absolutely amazing job at capturing that very feeling within each of his photographs. They present you with something that you could stare at for hours, something that sort of draws upon your inner peace.

Whenever I have come across canvases that encompass a lot of emptiness whilst bringing about a feeling of comfort I always stop to pause for a while and imagine that I am there, that I join whichever object or group of objects happen to be the focal point of the photograph for me, and that I completely embrace being a part of that scenario.

Jono has given me permission to include some of his images from his website on here, and I would urge anyone to go to his website and have a look, and if any of the images appeal to you more than the others, I understand that you can actually purchase the images on a canvas. Perfect.






All images are subject to copyright – Jono Renton.

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small vacationist

New Album – The Vacationist

He’s a lead vocalist, a guy responsible for incredibly powerful lyrics, enthralling sounds and who captivates any audience lucky enough to be in front of him…….and he’s just released a new album.

How could I resist the chance to gain some insight into how he’d managed to put me in a trance like state when I sat back and listed to The Vacationist, and in a way that generated so many new thoughts in my mind that after the album had finished I sat there in complete silence to contemplate them all? Well, I couldn’t, so here it is:

Q) So Cary before we get started, a little bit about yourself. How long have you been making music for, and what made you want to start in the first place?

A) Some of my earliest memories are related to music. I didn’t start playing guitar ’til I was about 13 and didn’t really open up my mouth to sing ’til I was in my early 20s. I remember being really young and my sister was playing U2 – War on her cassette deck in this early 80s Honda. I remember the song “Sunday Bloody Sunday” coming on and it did something to me. I didn’t know what it was at the time, but I realize now that it wasn’t just words that made me feel something; It was the combination of the way it was played, the cadence, the strain in his voice. It seemed so much more obvious to use more than just words to express something.

- PS don’t judge if you hate U2

Q) So with that said, who were originally your sources of inspiration and have your sources of inspiration changed somewhat as you’ve gone through life? Obviously this isn’t your first album as you’ve got quite a few great albums under your belt, but I’ve always wondered whether a musicians inspiration and motivation changes or almost evolves the more time they spend in the music world?

A) I don’t think that they change, I tend to just add to them as time passes. I still love stuff I loved through all my phases in life. Some of the bands I remember hitting me growing up would have been The Beatles, U2, a lot of different synth pop in the 80s, Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys, I went through a metal phase with Iron Maiden and early Metallica, followed by early hip-hop, Beasties, DMC, etc. I think The Cure may have been one of the biggest to influence me in my teenage years. There was a punk/hardcore phase, Bad Religion, Minor Threat, The Ramones and Gorilla Biscuits come to mind. A lot of folky and funky stuff, David Wilcox was huge for me, I really dug early Dave Matthews.

More modern bands I’ve gotten into the last few years I think would be AWOLNATION (actually grew up with Aaron), Passion Pitt, Muse. I don’t have any exclusivity when it comes to music, I think I literally like almost anything. I don’t listen to a ton of country, but still have a few songs here and there that I dig. I also went through classical stage in my teenage years that went on for a long time.

I think what fascinates me as a human and as an artist finds it’s way into my music. It’s funny though, I think in the last few years it’s been things outside of music that have influenced a lot of my recent writing. I can easily waste a day binging on Cosmos (old or new series), getting lost in anything Michio Kaku writes, reading about Einstein or Tesla, or waste a few hours on Jason Silva videos.

What fascinates me as a human and as an artist finds it's way into my music.

Q) So one could say that you certainly like to indulge in the occasional spot of philosophical or intellectual reading or viewing of material? Would you say that your low latent inhibition plays a part in your embracing such a diverse selection of thought provoking material and also plays a part in your being so receptive to so many different things?

A) I think it must. It’s always hard to credit LLI with the things I do or think though because it’s the only way I’ve ever been/thought. I’m constantly considering the possibilities, always sorting out ideas and filing them in certain parts of my mind ready to reference and associate with other pieces of information. It’s weird to think, and maybe this is an LLI thing, but realizing that your brain is a biological super computer is a powerful thing. When I was younger I hadn’t really spent a lot of time analyzing myself. I think with age though, you gain a little wisdom and hopefully use that to stand back and observe yourself as objectively as possible. Meditation I think is a very powerful thing. Quietening your mind and watching it, it’s downright entertaining at times. I think a lot of LLI people I’ve interacted with would relate.

Ithink with age you gain a little wisdom and hopefully use that to stand back and observe yourself as objectively as possible.

Q) Do you feel as though it’s important for a musician to have as diverse a taste or appreciation of music as possible, as it must help to take in and experience as many forms of musical stimuli as possible when it comes to having to then figure out what you’d like to hear or produce yourself? It almost seems like watching someone make a variety of alcoholic cocktails, and then you stepping to one side and making your own based on different combinations you saw them use.

A) I think diversity helps, but it’s probably different for everyone. It seems like anytime I read about successful artists, they’re typically huge music fans with a lot of diversity in their taste. I find a lot of the ideas I come up with that I get the most excited about though come from being somewhere alone in silence where there isn’t any noise or distraction. I keep a notebook with me all the time and I’ve noticed that if I’ve spent a few days without a lot of interaction the pages have a way of filling themselves with ideas, though that has more to do with words and lyrics.

I think it must be an LLI thing, just being open to possibility in general, though it’s not exclusive to LLI.

Q) Given that you obviously know about your having low latent inhibition, and with the fact that you’re able to step back at times and analyse things more so than when you were younger, do you notice any difference in terms of how you work when producing an album in comparison to the people you work with, or would you say that you have a natural affinity towards people with a similar mind to your own and that you naturally seek out people who fall into that category to work with?

A) Yeah, definitely. I think letting go of my brain and seeing what comes out is more of a typical practice than when I was young. When I’m writing, lyrics in particular, I like to be isolated and free to follow anything that crosses the monitor in my subconscious brain. I let a line that’s interesting fall on to the page. It doesn’t have to mean anything at the moment, it just needs to resonate in some way, whether it’s meter, hard consonants or just the way it flows. If there’s a good first line, it will typically dictate the next line and before I know it I’ve filled a page with verses/choruses/bridges and it feels complete.

The thing that interests me after a song is written, is going back and reading into the lyrics. If a little time has passed, I can be more objective and read into the lyrics as someone else, my present self as opposed to the person who wrote the song taking dictation from his subconscious. There have been a few mind blowing moments when I’ve analyzed lyrics that at the time of writing were practically nonsense, but after stepping back and revisiting them, they say so much about where I was when I wrote them. In some cases the lyrics are saying something I may have been uncomfortable saying in ‘real life’ shrouded in metaphor.

There have been a few mind blowing moments when I've analyzed lyrics that at the time of writing were practically nonsense, but after stepping back and revisiting them, they say so much about where i was when i wrote them.

As for the people I work with, I like diversity. I like people with different processes than me. My main collaborator on the record, Conor, also tends to isolate a lot, but as the record started to really develop, we found ourselves in the same room more and more bouncing ideas and recording them at the speed of thought. Then we’d separate, I’d go sing/write words and he’d tinker with sounds. It was really fun. I’d be in one room recording my guitar, not actual guitar playing but the sounds it makes when you toy with the electronics, plucking the strings beneath the saddle, knocking on the wood in different places, unplugging the cords and making electrical noises, putting magnets up to it to make it sound like some sort of space whale, or going out back and pounding on a dumpster.

I'd be in one room, recording my guitar, putting magnets up to it to make it sound like some sort of space whale.

Near the end we would have Sunnie, Kaleb, and Sam present to help solidify our ideas. They all bring a different, if not more pragmatic vibe to things. Sort of an “okay you weirdos, there’s some good songs and some really interesting songs, now let’s clean them up and make them make sense to the rest of the population.”

Q) It’s really fascinating for me as a non-musician to hear about the sheer depth involved in creating music and also writing the lyrics that go with it. I think that’s something that only musicians and lyricists grasp in it’s entirety as it’s a real shame that words can only portray so much of what goes into making a song or an album.

So compared to all of the other albums that you’ve created in the past, how would you say the preparation, thought and energy you put into The Vacationist differs from those, and for what reasons would you say things were different this time?

A) This album was different in a lot of ways. One of the things that stands out the most to me was that I was willing to let my subconscious really take the helm. I decided early on that I wouldn’t be reserving myself, that I wouldn’t withhold things I might normally. I don’t know if it was brave or careless. I thought less of how it would be received and allowed myself to be honest, direct, crass, abrasive even. I allowed my ‘inner nerd’ out of the cage. I’ve spent so much time since I was a kid looking at the stars, reading about what makes up the universe, longing to know the unknowable, it seemed that expressing a lot of that in an album was long overdue.

I've spent so much time since i was a kid looking at the stars, longing to know the unknowable, it seemed that expressing a lot of that in an album was long overdue

As for the musical side of things, I became less guarded as the album progressed. I started allowing Conor in on the production about halfway through, letting him call the shots and veto me when necessary. Then Sam, Kaleb, and Sunnie felt their way into the mix. It ended up being a Cary Judd record, but also ended up being something entirely different because of it, which is why I decided in conjunction with the members of the vacationist that it should be it’s own band going forward. I think it took a lot of letting go on my part. I found myself at a point where I had 4 other really talented people that I could trust to pick up the slack and make it something better than it otherwise would have been. It’s still my thoughts and my words and A LOT of my music, but the band brought perspective and shed light on these ideas I couldn’t have alone.

Q) That actually brings me on really nicely to my next question which is in relation to the people you worked with in creating this album. In terms of the people you worked with to create The Vacationist, had you worked with them all previously or was this very much a new adventure for you?

A) Conor (sound designer/guitar/synths) I had collaborated on a song called “Binary” with last winter. We ended up doing a different version for the record. Kaleb (drummer) was in another band that had spent some time this last summer recording at The Wormhole (mine/Conor’s studio) and just became a good friend. Sam (guitar) is in another band I really admire called A Sea of Glass. When it started looking like a band was forming, he was my ideal guitar player, and luckily for me was interested. Sunnie I’ve worked with on several non-musical but creative projects. She’s a professional photographer by day. She was in one day singing along and I made her jump in the vocal booth and sing into a vocoder. It wasn’t long before the idea of having someone who deals with visual imagery and lighting involved really sparked. She not only sings & plays some keys, but her main function when we’re playing live is the light design. She found a way to use a keyboard to trigger lights at different points in a performance so she’s literally playing the lights live.


Q) The Vacationist is very much a ‘larger than life’ type album, with reference to the cosmos, things outside of this planet and the universe as a whole. With the album having song titles such as “The Wormhole Express – a Trans-System Holiday”, “The Theory of Everything – The Delusion of Permanent habitation” and “Make Believe – Quantum Gatekeeper lyrics Syndrome” are those titles and references to such thought provoking areas relative to your own personal musings when you have a bit of quiet time to yourself, or would you say that they signify something else?

A) The initial titles are the names of the surface stories. What follows the “-“ is the analysis or the story behind the song my subconscious was trying to explain. This time around, rather than realizing much later what I was saying without knowing it, I’ve added that part of the process to the listener. Typically that’s just left for me. Those all absolutely came from the time spent alone. Allowing the ideas that were and are floating in the corners of my brain out to play is what sets this apart from anything else I’ve done. It’s the clearest rendering of the ideas, truths, spirituality, philosophy, and awe that live within their own universe system inside the biological grey matter that resides in my skull. Though some of the ideas may be totally crackpottish, they’re there and they wanted out.

Allowing the ideas that were and are floating in the corners of my brain out to play is what sets this apart from anything else I've done.

Q) There really seemed to be a lot of hype surrounding the build up to the release of The Vacationist, and a lot of excitement from people waiting to hear the full thing based on the tasters that you put out there on YouTube. When you declare that you’re working on a new album, does that put a certain amount of pressure on yourself to deliver something that not only you’re happy with, but that you know will have lots to offer all of the people whose ears you know it will grace?

A) At first, I do feel pressure. Somewhere along the way, especially this time around, it sinks in that I’m the artist. I’m not making art to suit anyone’s taste, I’m making it to first and foremost express myself, a sort of exercise of catharsis that I believe for whatever reason could be valuable to others. I think I realized this time more than ever, my job isn’t to make an album my existing fans will like, they already liked something they’ve heard that I’ve done in the past. I made another album because I had something more to say. The new album, just like any album between artist and fan, is another fork in the relationship. The existing fans will either relate or they won’t. They’ll listen for the first time and they’ll turn it up loud as the album progresses or they’ll turn it off and forget about it. It’s OK either way. All relationships either both grow and evolve or they fade into the background.

I knew halfway through that this album would challenge some fans and put others off. Now that it’s done, I think it’s worth giving a few listens, letting your imagination follow the stories and see if there isn’t something in there that relates to your own thoughts or sparks a new perspective.

I think in the past the most success, which comes through connecting with other humans on an emotional and intellectual level, happens when I don’t try to give people what they want, but rather make something they didn’t know they wanted ’til it existed.

Q) With what you’ve said about writing the lyrics and music to primarily express yourself, are there any underlying tones or messages within The Vacationist that you hope will resonate to people out there, or is it very much the type of album where you hope each person will be able to create their own meanings and relations based on your musical expression?

A) If there were an underlying tone or theme, I would point to the awe that comes with being human. You can stand anywhere and look up at a vast universe right in front of you. I don’t know how to quantify or value what being human is, but I know that in all that space, we are fairly rare. I don’t have any definitive knowledge of what the cosmos is, what God is, or what I am for that matter, but it’s pretty damn amazing in and of itself that we exist at all and I hope people feel the joy of that when they hear this record.

If there were an underlying tone or theme (to the album) I would point to the awe that comes with being human.

Q) Very eloquently spoken there (as I’d expect from a lyricist of your calibre haha). I know it might be like asking a parent to choose who their favorite child is, but during or after you’d created the Vacationist did you find that you had a particular song that you favor or prefer from the rest and if so, what are the reasons for that?

A) This record is about hope to find truth, the beauty that is already present in our world and universe, and loving what we are, even if we don’t know what that is.

At the present moment, and I’d have given you a different answer yesterday and would give you a different answer tomorrow, I’m really pleased with “The Theory of Everything”. The spitfire manifesto at the end of that song is pure acceptance and elation to me. I’m proud of my words there.

“this is the death of the sun a species singing as one this is “Imagine” at last as we baptize our past we are bathing in light we are the stars in the night this is a brand new start for the immortal at heart this is a place without sin sailing solar winds all are kings and queens this is the theory of everything”

Q) They are some incredibly deep and thought provoking lyrics Cary, and given people will be able to read your lyrics online and a few of them in the passage above, that leads me to ask whether people will be able to hear your lyrics in person and do therefore plan on touring now that The Vacationist is released, and gracing people with some live performances, and if so where are you likely to be headed?

A) We intend to start doing some shows in the Pacific Northwest and mountain region of the U.S. This winter. The cool thing about this group of people is that we’re all willing to go all-in with this project. We are currently looking for touring opportunities beyond that in 2015.

Q) What would you say the positives and negatives are of both performing in a studio and performing in front of a live audience? I don’t think I need to ask which you prefer given the stage presence you have when I’ve seen you performing in videos and the way in which you connect with the audience!

A) Positives to studio: You can polish and hone your performances. Negative to studio: No eye contact with your audience. No flinging sweat on the front row.

Positives to live: Eye contact, sweat, the catharsis of singing full volume into a hot mic.

Negatives of Live: This band has a very involved live setup with projection mapping and a lot of wires.

Q) If you could wind back time and do anything differently in relation to your career in music, or change something that you’ve done, what would that be?

A) I don’t know that I would change anything. I’ve had some crazy ups and downs, but who knows, if it had been different the ups may have been less and the downs may have been more. I’ve had to many priceless experiences to trade for “what ifs”.

Q) If you could sum up The Vacationist in one sentence, what would that sentence be?

A) We are here to make light.

Q) Finally, is there anything that you want to say to all of the people who have yet to listen to your album?

A) I think there is something on that record that anyone with human DNA will relate to if they’ll give it the time.

Cary, thank you very much for your time and to wrap up the Q&A, can you confirm where people should go to listen to the album now? How they can go about purchasing the album and any merchandise and also, when will it be available in iTunes?

It will be on iTunes by the end of Nov – I’d also just like to say that this album was made possible by the support of the fans who contributed through the Kickstarter campaign, and I’d like to thank each and every one of them.

Interview by Dale Webb